Winter Flooding Should Not be Underestimated

September 2, 2021 | Created by: Andreas Klippe

Winter Flooding

We usually hear of summer storms during half of the year. However, are they the only ones that can cause floods? Absolutely not, because a lot of flooding and damage happen as well during winter months. Thus, we should not regard winter flooding as less important as it can also be disastrous. 

To understand how grave it is, let us come to know its threats, and find out how we can control them in the latter part of this blog. 

Warning of Winter Flooding

From the Pacific Northwest to the Great Lakes to the Northeast, the flood threats persevere in the form of snowmelt, ice jams, and winter storms. 

1 – Snowmelt

Snow melts under trees, winter flooding
Snow melts under trees.

When snow thaws too fast, and then it is absorbed into soil, surrounding water bodies, and drainage systems, it can flood nearby areas. In consequence, the water could reach your home basement. 

Snowmelt flooding can occur anywhere across the snowy Northern United States. In most cases, it happens in small, localized events. Still, these events can result in great damage. 

An inch of floodwater can already cost you as much as $25k in restoration. 

While the threat of snowmelt is higher in the spring, climate change has instigated more and more untimely warm temperatures every winter. Therefore, serious winter flooding becomes more inevitable. 

2 – Ice Jams

As snow melts, chunks of ice can jam up the house and cause flooding, winter flooding
As snow melts, chunks of ice can jam up the house and cause flooding.

When periods of warm weather follow long cold spells, ice jam flooding takes place. As temperatures warm, huge chunks of ice roughly sever, obstruct waterways, and send water into neighboring areas. 

Ice jams normally occur during spring thaw, just like snowmelt, while the flooding behind ice jams is most common in Alaska.

3 – Winter Storms

Giant waves caused by strong winds hit the coastline, winter flooding
Giant waves caused by strong winds hit the coastline.

In all likelihood, people who reside in lakeside places like Chicago are closely acquainted with winter flooding. 

Winter storms bring strong winds that can create giant waves that hit coastlines and barriers into streets. 

Winter storms and following floods frequently happen in the Midwest along the Great Lakes and the East Coast. 

Regular heavy rainfall and flash floods can also occur throughout the winter, provided that temperatures are high enough. 

Your Home Flood Protection in Any Season

The RS Lift-Hinged Flood Gate prevents the snowmelt from entering the house garage.

As summer storms can be violent enough to cause casualties and destroy homes, snowmelt, ice jams, and winter storms are no different because of the severe flooding they may also bring about.  

When snow thaws too fast, and then it is absorbed into soil, surrounding water bodies, and drainage systems, it can flood nearby areas. In consequence, the water could reach your home basement.

To make sure that your home is ready to weather any storm — in summer or winter — you need a flood protection barrier like RS Lift-Hinged Flood Gate for the following reasons:

  1. It has durable seals. Melting snow CANNOT seep into it NOR can it reach your basement.
  2. It can resist ANY weather conditions (e.g., climate change). Even if temperatures get higher and worse during winter, it can stand tall and flood-protect your home.
  3. It has a quick response time. You don’t have to worry about possible flash floods in winter, because this gate guarantees fast operation and protection. It only takes 15 seconds to lock it as it is lightweight and has smooth winding-lift action and single-point locking mechanism. Hence, limited warning of winter flooding disaster is not a problem!

RS Lift-Hinged Flood Gate can be your flood protection barrier in any season! Watch how it can be as simple as your gate at home by clicking the “WATCH THE VIDEO” button. 

If you have queries, click the “BOOK A MEETING FOR FREE” and have a conversation with a Flood Expert.